By Dave Fuller on 8/29/2014 5:18 PM
Spica during the day? 

Today is the day that the Moon was to be within 2 degrees of Spica in the daytime sky. Cloudy weather and even a bit of rain was the order of most of the day today. But I just went outside a little bit ago, and realized... hey, it's clear! Well, clearish. Not exactly superb transparency by any means. 

Moon points to Spica during the dayBut always being one to try for all things astronomical whenever possible, I hauled out my 6" f/5 scope, as it was the quickest and easiest scope I could get out the door while the Moon was still in between two sets of tall pine trees to my southwest. Found the...
By Dave Fuller on 8/26/2014 7:49 PM
People are surprised that they can see stars during the day that are not the Sun. “What? Really? How is that possible?” It is possible because bright stars are... well, bright! The trick is that you need to know the exact spot to look, because you won't have the crutch of a dark sky to make the star's contrast with the sky as obvious.

So how to find a star in the sky this week? Use the Moon as your guide. On Friday August 29th, the Moon will be a waxing crescent. Now, some people are still surprised that the Moon can be seen during the day, but that's another matter. Even crescent like this shines at magnitude negative nine, more than sufficient to be seen in a clear blue sky.

Moon and Sun in sky Aug 28 2014

The first step is to find the Moon in the sky, and you have a window of a couple hours for the easiest spotting of the star. For the first opportunity, look slightly before 3:00 pm EDT/12:00 pm PDT....
By Dave Fuller on 1/26/2014 10:10 PM
Mars near Spica last week of January 2014

For the next week or so, the Red Planet of Mars will be nearby the bluish white star of Spica. The two will not be much above the horizon at midnight, but an hour later achieve enough elevation to be reasonably observed. The contrast between them should make for an interesting sight, too: Mars has a very distinct, orange hue to it, and Spica is a large, B-spectral class star that glows with a bluish tint. 

With the two objects at nearly the same magnitude, and just a few finger width's apart from each other, they are well suited to comparison. Of course, the actual size and distance is fascinating to consider as well. 

Mars is a mere 1 Astronomical Unit from Earth this week - or about 150,000,000...

The Nightlight

This blog includes what to see in the night and daytime skies, thoughts on telescopes, binoculars, and other astronomy observing accessories and equipment, plus my own occasional notes on objects I've seen and observed. Oh, and the random theater or other "my take on life" post. In other words, there is always something interesting. Check it out.